The SBA Loan Market: Financing In Greater Demand Than Ever

Nationally speaking, the finance of owner-occupied commercial real estate seems to never get significantly easier. Our current national economic conditions of recovery have not yet heated up the average enthusiasm of bankers for financing sub-$2M expansions in most real estate sectors, which ensures a more or less permanent lending gap affecting small business that Congress has recognized and addressed with the creation of the Small Business Administration.

Dating back to the Herbert Hoover administration, what eventually became the SBA was established by Congress to help businesses hurt by the Great Depression of 1929-39.  Shepherded along by Franklin Roosevelt, the program evolved during World War II to assist smaller suppliers with loans in competing against huge corporations for manufacture of war materiel.  The SBA we know today was created in 1952 by Congress and signed into law the next year by Dwight Eisenhower, spinning it off from the US Department of Commerce into the standalone agency “under the general direction and supervision of the President”.

7(a) – The SBA’s Keystone Loan Program

SBA’s lending and programs are many, but the biggest and most used is called 7(a) Loan Guaranty, where loans up to $5M are available to business for a wide range of purposes including real estate financing.  Terms can reach as long as 25 years while most loan repayments are shorter than that.

Fixed-rate 504 loans

While SBA offerings under its 7(a) program are fairly well known, less widely known is the 504 Certified Development Company loan program. Offering long-term fixed-rate loans for purchases of real estate or equipment, 504 is lauded for lower costs because the fixed interest rates tend to be below-market.

Intermediaries called Certified Development Companies commonly secure 40% of such loans, with 10% coming from borrowers and the remaining 50% coming from a private lender under SBA guarantee. According to the most recently published SBA Quarterly Lending Bulletin, the aggregated number of small business loans outstanding reached almost $600 billion, reflecting a rise year-over-year of 1.7%.

Both commercial industrial (C&I) and commercial real estate (CRE) loans make up small business loans.1 A careful look at these loans shows that they continue to indicate progress in capital availability for small businesses. For example, C&I continues to maintain a positive uneven growth (Figure 2). In addition, the decline in the small business share of CRE loans has slowed. C&I loan standards changed little in the first quarter of 2015, but bankers reported easing standards and terms on loans secured by nonfarm nonresidential borrowing (Federal Reserve’s Board Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey). While there was not a significant change in demand for C&I loans, respondents reported that the demand was stronger for all CRE loan size categories.

The reminder is that SBA financing is a heavily-used option for the commercial real estate deals that are in the reach of professionals in secondary and tertiary markets.  As the recovery struggles to spread itself evenly across all the scales of local market in the US, 7(a) and 504 programs are there to make that recovery felt in every corner of the economy.

 

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