Browse Tag: Retail

Innovation in Retail

Neil Golub is Sales Executive with Xceligent in the New York Tri-State area. Connect with Neil on LinkedIn: NeilGolub.

Our New York Next Generation ICSC Committee assembled a diverse group of companies to discuss “The Emergence and Impact of Disruptive Retail Concepts”. As retail faces headwinds with economic challenges and changes in consumer behavior, it was insightful to hear from these companies who have sprouted over the past few years by listening and adapting to the market.

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Is the Retail Apocalypse Fact or Fiction?

Is the Retail Apocalypse Fact or FIction

Is the Retail Apocalypse – Fact or Fiction?

If you read the headlines, you would believe the Retail Apocalypse is imminent with announcements seemingly each week of new store closures. In fact, earlier this year, we posted a story called Retail Store Closures Pick Up Speed, Says Report based on a report by Fung Global Retail and Technology Tracker.  But a new report by IHL Group entitled Debunking the Retail Apocalypse provides an alternative perspective.  Their research shows that retailers and restaurants are planning to open 14,248 locations in 2017 compared to 10,168 announced closures.  A net increase of more than 4,000 new stores is a very different story than what is captured in the headlines.  And the projections for 2018 are even stronger with more than 5,500 openings projected.

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Retail Store Closures Pick Up Speed, Says Report

chart showing fung global numbers of retail store closures in 2017

The preeminent trend in the national retail sector is a wave of bad news coming in harder and faster than before. Store closures, according to a recent report by the Fung Global Retail and Technology Tracker, have seen an eye-popping 218% increase over the previous year.

The Fung Global Retail & Technology Tracker watches store openings and closures “for a select group of retailers.” The most recent report cited losses

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Walgreens Rite Aid Purchase Hits Antitrust Snag

English: Walgreens in Little Egg Harbor, New J...

With 13,200 stores in 11 countries including over 8,100 in the USA, Walgreens Boots Alliance, home to the venerable Walgreens drugstore brand, made big news in October 2015 when it announced its intention to acquire national drug chain Rite Aid. Rite Aid’s 4,600 stores across the US would join Walgreens in a mega-deal — pending approval by the Federal Trade Commission.

However, recent developments suggest the FTC is not happy with the idea.  By the time the dust settles, Walgreens could be compelled to kill the deal or move over 1,000 stores to the sales block in order to get the deal done

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Boo Diligence: Evaluating The Halloween Industry

With over 4,000 haunted houses and horror attractions running across the United States, chances are there’s one serving your scarea. Ever wonder what goes into site selection for these specialty properties? Plenty of boo diligence.

The holiday’s economic impact is spooktacular: according to the National Retail Federation, Americans spent over $8 billion on Halloween in 2012. October brings not only p-eek foot traffic for haunted attractions, but also a wave of retail pop-ups to sell costumes and party supplies. Chopping center managers know: these seasonal pop-ups can produce a distinct upward pressure on NOI (net op-boo-rating income) for the fourth quarter balance sheet.

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Cornstalks In The Big Box? Target To Add In-Store Vertical Farms

English: Logo of Target, US-based retail chain

Major metropolitan areas are making an effort to distance themselves from the traditional food supply chain. Cities, dreaming of achieving food independence from the farms that surround them, are increasingly turning to vertical farming projects that grow food in urban settings.  Thanks to giant advances in green engineering and sustainable agricultural technologies, these vertical farms are gaining industrial scale efficiency.

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When Chains Close, What Happens To Retail Rents?

A major problem with using statistics is that today it’s much easier to count things than it is to decide exactly what to count, or exactly why to count. The answers we obtain when analyzing economic and commercial real estate data may reflect the real world, but there’s no guarantee that a set of questions are the right ones. In data science or statistical analysis, the quality of an answer entirely depends on the quality of the design of the question asked.

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