Browse Tag: measure jjj

Build Better L.A.: Los Angeles Votes In New Requirements For Developers, Affordable Housing

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A significant initiative with commercial real estate effects was passed on last week’s ballot in Los Angeles. Expected to take effect this month, the measure changes, almost overnight, the labor and affordable housing requirements for developers building in the city, affecting multifamily projects with ten or more units, as well as other projects.

Measure JJJ, also known as the Build Better L.A. initiative, was sent to the voters in the general election of Nov. 8.  In Los Angeles City, JJJ passed with 64% of the vote at over 461,000 votes and according to JDSupra law blog, takes effect within ten days of the certification of vote results, or, on November 19, 2016.

Affecting projects that ask for a zoning exemption, a plan amendment, a height change or a authorization of residential use of land where previously not permitted, JJJ requires developers of projects with ten residential units or above to provide a percentage of affordable housing units on-site. Depending on the exemption sought, the percentage will fall between 5% and 40% affordable units.

Some alternatives to compliance are available.  Per JDSupra:

[T]he Initiative offers alternatives to compliance, including providing affordable housing units off-site, acquisition of “at-risk” affordable housing properties and converting the units into non-profit or other similar type of housing, or payment of an in‑lieu fee into the City’s new Affordable Housing Trust Fund. The in-lieu fee will be determined by a formula using an “Affordability Gap” multiplier as defined in the Initiative.  Additionally, projects that opt to provide off-site housing will be required to provide additional affordable units based on a formula that increases the number of required units based on the distance from the primary project.

Further, the Initiative requires that residential housing projects seeking discretionary approval be constructed by licensed contractors, with good faith effort to ensure that 30% of whom are permanent Los Angeles residents and at least 10% of whom are “transitional workers”—single parents, veterans, on public assistance, or chronically unemployed—whose primary place of residence is within a 5‑mile radius of the project.  Projects subject to the Initiative will be required to pay “prevailing wage”—an average of area wages based on a formula created by the state government—to all construction workers on the project.

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)