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CRE Brokers’ Ingredients to Success

CRE Brokers’ Ingredients to Success

Today’s guest post is by Dave Morris, CCIM, Sales Executive with Xceligent and former president of St. Louis CCIM, SIOR, Missouri Commercial Realtors, and St. Louis Commercial Realtors chapters. Connect with David on LinkedIn: DavidMorrisCCIM

 

CRE Brokers’ Ingredients to Success

What do top producers do differently than average brokers? They adhere to a discipline of hard work, market knowledge, and relationships.

Aptitude

A broker must be educated enough to know investment real estate theory and why CRE works for investors. They must also keep pace with many industries and know whether a sector is growing or dying and why.

Attitude

Think and act like a winner. (Fake it until you make it if required). Enthusiastically think “team” and “collaboration” to bring about win-win deals. In general, winners want to work with winners…attract winners to your circle. Execute your services with the highest ethical standards.

Work Ethic

Put in the hours. Stretch your comfort zone. Do the things other brokers don’t or aren’t willing to do.

Infrastructure and Support

Take inventory of every resource available to you (software, CRM systems, lease analysis, Xceligent, staff, senior management, etc…). You need an infrastructure of capable support staff with access to the necessary tools to conduct your business effectively and productively.

Brand Recognition

Build your personal brand within your company brand. A positive reputation is everything! You and your company must be seen as a trusted source.

Market Depth

Work in a market niche (by product type or geography) that has a deep enough commission base and that you are able to control a reasonable and sustainable market share. Every year, re-evaluate it and try to expand on it.

Market and Economic Conditions

While somewhat out of your control, whatever the conditions, you must understand how different cycles affect your marketplace, then plan and react accordingly. Top producers know and understand trends which allow them to stay ahead of the curve.

Relationships

CRE brokers are the fabric of the business marketplace. Combine your personal relationships with your business relationships. Educate everyone you know as to what kinds of opportunities you’re specifically seeking. Do the same for people/customers you know. (You will win a client/friend for life if you refer them a prospect!)

Five Googie Architecture Properties (And Nearby Available Listings) In Los Angeles

The mid-century commercial architecture style called Googie was named for the 1949 Los Angeles coffee shop bearing the same name.  Originated by Frank Lloyd Wright assistant John Lautner, the Googie style is iconic for its ultra-modern, space-age look.  The commercial construction craze for cantilevered roofs and eccentric curves took off nationally from coffee shop roots on the L.A. corner of Crescent Heights and Sunset, spreading an aesthetic reflecting two huge phenomena of the 1950s: the automobile and the service industry that grew along with it.

Surviving Googie buildings evoke the past while looking to a former future. Beloved by many, their proximity can make the difference for a site selection client faced with a choice among candidate properties with no comparable “face”. One thing Googie buildings do is project — after all they seem to be rocketing into that imagined future — and having one nearby can easily be a bright spot for tenants, a distinction that serves that part of commerce that numbers alone can’t quite capture.

Let’s take a look around Los Angeles for opportunities around some of these iconic Googie properties:

Abandoned Construction: A Leading Indicator For Economic Change?

4th lock on the canal, abandoned in constructi...

The commercial real estate data ecosystem is an exciting place where study of routine market phenomena promises to expose new knowledge and improve our perception of market trends. When it comes to routine phenomena in the CRE industry, construction permitting and construction abandonment are great examples. Abandoned construction can follow permit issuance, even though issuing a permit reflects a milestone in a commercial property development where forward-looking diligence, commitment and optimism on the part of the underwriters, the developer and local government are all at high enough volume to actually break ground on a project.  What can the data on construction permitting and abandoned construction show us about that area?

Of course, getting past an important milestone does not ensure a completed project. When construction is permitted and begins, but does not complete, it’s a sign that something went wrong in the typical arenas: financial (scheduled funding does not materialize), legal (neighbors, competitors or government catch up to the plans), collaborative (partnerships/joint ventures stress and fracture),  insurance, construction — you name it, it can go south.

Beyond being bad news for individual development and developers, abandoned construction also projects ills onto the surrounding area, effectively serving as a highly visible advertisement for the area’s potential for uncertainty and failure. Is it possible that counting and analyzing an area’s abandoned construction projects can produce a leading economic indicator?

That’s the premise behind the report at BuildFax.com, a real estate data analytics team based who looked at the linkage between construction project abandonment and wider economic change in the related areas. The findings are fascinating and the relationships might surprise you.

You can download a free copy of the BuildFax report “Is Abandoned Construction An Early Signal For Economic Change?” at this link.   The study finds a tight association among its sample between abandoned construction and wider economic bad news for sample areas. The study blends fifteen years of construction data with current data, so the model isn’t fit for prediction today. But without a doubt, the study can make an impact on the thinking around abandoned construction and the full range of what failed projects can add up to for communities, businesses, and all stakeholders.

Photo credit: Wikipedia

Marijuana Real Estate: The Business Impact Of Legalization

English: Discount Medical Marijuana cannabis s...

Today’s guest post is by Steve Golin, SVP, Strategic Accounts at Xceligent.

The 2016 election season bought another crop of nine states joining Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Alaska and Washington DC in approving recreational and medicinal marijuana sales at the retail level. While the growth and occupancy of storefront retail establishments is the most conspicuous sign of a burgeoning industry, the behind-the-scenes marijuana real estate uses of cultivation, manufacture and processing have proven to be the most impactful on the supply of industrial real estate in markets where cannabis has been legalized.

Legalized cannabis generates huge cultural and social impact plus wealth generation, with commercial real estate a key benefactor. The marijuana real estate impact for each market’s industrial property base will vary by state based on product growing climate and existing real property base inventory. Let’s notice the historical trends in Denver, one of the earliest civic adopters of medical and retail marijuana.

In 2012 Colorado voters passed Amendment 64 legalizing recreational use of marijuana. By mid-year 2016, 62 of Colorado’s 271 municipalities and 22 of the state’s counties had created rules and regulations governing recreational marijuana use. With interstate distribution of a controlled substance still prohibited at the Federal level, each state and the associated market forces were compelled to create the environment necessary to manufacture, distribute and regulate product.

At a state level, regulations now provide for licensing of cultivation facilities, product manufacturing facilities, testing facilities, and retail stores. Local governments were put in the position of allowing or prohibiting related facilities at the whim of their voters. Many cities and counties opted to not allow for either retail dispensaries and grow operations, leaving the City and County of Denver controlling the lion’s share of the market. Translating this opportunity for a commercial real estate industry suffering through the 2009 financial crisis reveals a staggering result. Absorption of older Class C industrial properties skyrocketed through the recession of 2010 – 2014 to the tune of 4 million SF. Since 2014, according to Xceligent Market Trends Reports, Denver added another 2 million square feet in industrial absorption. In 2016, occupancy numbers for cannabis related grow and distribution activity now totals 8 million SF statewide plus another 1.5 million in greenhouse operations.

“Colorado’s marijuana industry is a mature business having already been through 2-3 business cycles with significant inflection points”, according to Jason Thomas of Avalon Realty Advisors, a leading industry professional services firm. “While each state is building its own machine to adapt to the new industry dynamic, Colorado is the model and leader of regulation for the industry” adds Mr. Thomas*.

Colorado’s dramatic absorption of light industrial real estate from 2010 through 2016 can be directly attributed to State regulatory oversight of “seed to sale”. How will this develop in other states? The depth of development will correlate directly to the regulatory, business and geographic climate in each state. Certain economically troubled cities and towns will look to grow operations as business reality for their functionally obsolete industrial and land base.  Adelanto, CA, for example has taken a leap of faith and tied itself to the industry. Dozens of land deals there potentially aggregating over 100 acres of development rights are whispered to have occurred. This could portend California experiencing staggering absorption in outdated industrial inventory and land once the transition from Medical to Retail is regulated. 

For the CRE investor, owner and developer valuing and trading properties with cannabis related occupancy is rife with conflicts even as the industry matures. Class C properties that once sold for $20.00 or 30.00 dollars per square foot, now have $200.00 in new improvements and may be leasing for $12.00-$16.00 NNN. Valuations must take into consideration rent, improvements, function, tax, legal concerns (federal forfeiture, etc.). Given these considerations, cap rate values based on income generally range from 11% to 13% according to some industry professionals.

The risk to landlords from existing federal statutes may still control investment decisions. Marijuana is still illegal and classified as a Schedule I Controlled Substance. Federal marijuana charges still pose risks including the risks of being charged with maintaining drug-involved premises, racketeering/RICO, money laundering, significant fines, forfeiture of property and/or jail time.  

Regardless of inherent risks, I think future investment and development of marijuana industry infrastructure and logistics is here to stay. Market conditions for related commercial real estate activity rest with each state’s independent climates for regulation, licensing, cultivation, processing and growing. For instance: the Bay Area in California has little developable land, so marijuana real estate investment there will be in warehousing. Riverside / San Bernardino has a huge industrial base, but it is significantly institutional, so the majority of warehousing will be through private ownership.

Once the initial tranche of investment takes place, the industry will look to alternative regional areas, like Adelanto in California or Pueblo in Colorado. Any supply-and-demand dynamic creates absorption of a certain class of real estate that will put upward pressure on rents and property valuations as the industry develops and matures. The commercial real estate industry gained enormous experience in Colorado over the past 7 years and will use that insight to evaluate opportunities for each market in the coming wave. Hold on tight,

Special thanks to James R. Thompson, Esq. Of Counsel, Miller & Law, P.C., Littleton, CO for his contribution on statutes impacting landlords.

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Browse Properties Near The New Las Vegas Raiders Stadium Site

A screenshot showing CommercialSearch.com's listed commercial properties surrounding the site of the proposed Las Vegas Raiders stadium site
Quickly search a walkable zone around the new Las Vegas Raiders stadium site.

The Las Vegas Raiders stadium land deal has crossed a major milestone. On May 2, 2017, the Associated Press was the first to report the activation of a sale deed for a 60+acre site near the Strip in Las Vegas for the construction of a stadium to house the NFL franchise Oakland Raiders when the team completes its move to Las Vegas in 2020.

The land deal, which includes two vacant parcels, came in at $77 million, significantly below the $100 million price tag that had been assigned by a public board overseeing the $1.9 billion stadium project. The NFL team owners voted one month ago to approve the move from Oakland to Las Vegas for the storied football franchise, and AP reports that the team has taken 40,000 $100.00 refundable deposits on “personal seat licenses” from fans.

The combined parcels are bordered on the east by I-15 with a view of the Las Vegas strip, on the north by Hacienda Ave., on the west by Polaris Ave. and on the south by Russell Road.

Browse Properties Walkable To The Proposed Las Vegas Raiders Stadium

There’s an easy way for site selection professionals and analysts who are interested in getting in on the economic impact of the Las Vegas $1.9 billion stadium project to get a quick sense of nearby commercial property availability. Click to find dozens of  properties near the proposed Las Vegas Raiders stadium at CommercialSearch.com.  The search query draws a walkable rectangle around the stadium site and includes retail, land, office, industrial and multifamily properties for sale or lease in that rectangle.

Get A Free Copy Of The Latest Las Vegas Market Report from Xceligent

If you need more Las Vegas market background from the city’s top commercial real estate professionals, you can get it for free. Click to request copies of the latest (1Q2017) free Las Vegas Market Reports (specify Retail, Office or Industrial) from Xceligent.

 

Latest Federal Reserve Beige Book: National CRE Market Review

The Federal Reserve Beige Book, the national summary of the economy as published eight times yearly by the Federal Reserve Board arrived April 19.  What’s the commercial real estate national market picture at-a-glance?  Here’s an executive overview by district.

New York: Housing markets have improved somewhat except at the high end, while commercial real estate markets have been steady to slacker. […] industrial market continued to strengthen. New construction activity has been sluggish–both on the commercial and residential side. Banks reported that loan demand strengthened, while delinquency rates were mostly steady.

Minneapolis: commercial real estate activity was steady at strong levels.

Boston: Commercial real estate markets were somewhat mixed in the region. [..] Office construction activity continued to be restrained across the District. […]  Apartment construction activity remained significant but the pace of new deliveries slowed and the pipeline of planned projects contracted somewhat amid evidence of slowing rent growth.

Philadelphia: Commercial real estate loan volumes grew notably […]

Richmond: On balance, commercial real estate leasing rose moderately. Industrial and retail leasing and sales activity remained very active throughout the District.  […] Commercial real estate loan demand generally strengthened, but varied throughout the District.

Atlanta: Demand for commercial real estate continued to improve and construction increased from the year-ago level across most of the District. […] Most commercial real estate contacts noted improvements in demand that continued to result in rent growth and increased absorption, but cautioned that the rate of improvement varies by metropolitan area, submarket, and property type

Chicago: The pace of commercial real estate activity increased only a little overall, and the gains were limited to the for-lease segment. That said, a number of contacts reported signs of slowing activity, particularly in the retail segment.

St Louis:  Commercial real estate activity has been flat since the previous report. Local contacts indicated that demand has remained steady for most property types. Contacts noted some concerns that St. Louis office vacancy rates will rise in the near future due to new construction combined with expiring leases of vacant properties. […] Commercial construction activity was mixed.

Minneapolis: […] commercial real estate activity was flat at strong levels. […] Office vacancy rates in Minneapolis-St. Paul have ticked higher after significant new office development. There were reports of more preleasing before new projects move into the construction phase. A Minneapolis-St. Paul source noted that retail vacancies had crept up to 6 percent, but that “is still considered very low. Prime retail areas are very tight and have high rents.”

Kansas City:   […] [C]ommercial real estate sector activity continued to rise at a modest pace as vacancy rates declined and absorption, completions, construction underway, sales and prices increased. A moderate expansion in the commercial real estate sector was expected in the coming months.

Dallas:  Apartment leasing activity slowed and occupancy fell in the first quarter. Annual rent growth was solid in Dallas-Fort Worth but moderated in Austin. Rents were flat to down in Houston. Contacts generally expect slower rent growth this year.

Demand for office space was healthy in Dallas-Fort Worth, and office construction continued to be elevated there. In Houston, office demand was mostly weak and office construction tapered.

San Francisco: In some regions, activity in the commercial real estate sector slowed to a modest pace. In Alaska, residential and commercial construction activity declined, as commercial investment stalled and overall economic activity remained sluggish.

Legal Marijuana: What Will The DOJ Do To A Growing Business?

Seal of the United States Department of Justice

US Attorney General Jeff Sessions has gotten to work on clarifying the US Department of Justice’s posture on legal marijuana. The move couldn’t come sooner for the commercial real estate industry supporting this growing sector of the economy.

The enforcement of federal marijuana laws in the face of legalization by 29 states is of considerable concern to commercial real estate markets; based on the latest wave of state legislation passed, nearly 1 in 5 Americans now have access to state-legal marijuana, a figure that encompasses a whopping 68 million people.

In legalized states — and in the states expected to vote in favor of legalizing — the commercial real estate industry is on the march with sourcing and developing the industrial, land and retail property types that support and house the growing, distribution and dispensary needs of the legal marijuana business. But the road has gotten bumpy since the 2016 election.

A perpetual challenge to smooth real estate investment and to property sourcing is market uncertainty, and the Trump administration has been doing the legal marijuana industry no favors on that score. Since his confirmation as AG, Sessions, who as recently as April 2016 made the statement that marijuana users aren’t “good people”, has introduced quite a bit of national uncertainty into the legal marijuana business.  First pointing to Congress as the responsible party for a final decision, Sessions this week got a memo out to 94 US Attorney’s offices and DOJ heads that appears to take greater ownership of the impasse in legal marijuana enforcement.

The memo (read the full memo here)  addresses a newly created Task Force of Crime Reduction and Public Safety and tasks them with the following:

Task Force subcommittees will also undertake a review of existing policies in the areas of charging, sentencing, and marijuana to ensure consistency with the Department’s overall strategy on reducing violent crime and with Administration goals and priorities. Another subcommittee will explore our use of asset forfeiture and make recommendations on any improvements needed to legal authorities, policies, and training to most effectively attack the financial infrastructure of criminal organizations. 

Gone is any mention of Congress, and the singling out of marijuana in a sentence concerning itself with consistency reads (to these eyes, anyway) as a signal that the AG is looking for ideas from his bureaucracy. If I had to guess, at least some of the feedback Sessions receives will mention in no uncertain terms that violent crime and the legal marijuana business are distinctly different phenomena in at least 29 states of the union.

The deadline for response from the memo recipients is July 27th of this year.

Self Storage Investing On Rebound In 2017

Photo of self-storage facility hallway

After reading IRR’s latest report on the national self-storage property marketplace, I was inspired to take a closer look at this dynamic sub-sector. A wealth of commentary and metrics, the 2017 National Viewpoint National Self-Storage Report lifts the veil on this specialty sub-sector’s comeback from the 2008 recession and suggests where the market is headed based on past performance.

The fundamentals of the market are solid, says report author Steven J. Johnson, MAI, Senior Managing Director at IRR-Metro L.A.  Coming off of a hot year in 2016, the national marketplace in self-storage saw two huge portfolio deals completing, totaling over $3 billion alone. This in a wider market that sports some interesting drivers and leading indicators:

Only 15% of self-storage held by REITs

Quoting the report as calling the national market “fragmented” and dominated by small groups or mom-and-pop operations, it surprised me to see that institutional investors have thus far left 85% of the self-storage pie on the table. From where I’m sitting, that suggests that, all things being equal, acquisition volume in is likely to rise in 2017. Adding to the heat: cap rates on average are landing between 6 and 6.25% across all class types.

Customer life events drive the self-storage business

Classic drivers of the self-storage industry include marriages and divorces.  There were approximately 2.2 million marriages and 800K+ divorces in the US in 2016.  This shows basically flat to declining national trends, both trailing downward slightly, which might appear to go against the case for market growth, but remember that buried in these numbers are cohabitation events displacing some marriages.  Other important life events include births,

See for yourself: browse Self Storage national property listings right now at CommercialSearch.com

Check out the live national picture in self-storage property right now —  click over to this query of  self-storage properties for sale at CommercialSearch.com. The current listings count reads nearly 250 properties, located all across the US in primary, secondary and tertiary markets. The range of locations and classes tell the tale: this is an investment property class that has hung out its shingle and is doing business.

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

CommercialSearch Integrates Realtors Property Resource

Logos of CommercialSearch and RPR

Transformational providers of commercial real estate data don’t often find ways to interoperate, but when they do, the user benefits pile up fast.  Starting tomorrow, a notable new integration arrives: REALTOR® users of CommercialSearch’s national marketplace in commercial real estate data will have one-click access to powerful new features driven by RPR Commercial, including tax information, transaction history, and more.  From RPR:

As of March 16, 2017, REALTORS® with CommercialSearch who hold RPR accounts can easily jump from a listing within CommercialSearch into RPR’s extensive commercial property and trade area data, investment analysis tools, business intel, and comprehensive reports.

“RPR’s mission is to serve the needs of our 1.2 million REALTORS®,” said Emily Line, RPR vice president of commercial services. “Through partnerships like the RPR / CommercialSearch integration, we are able to expand our service offerings and to ultimately save our members time and money previously spent on multiple applications and subscriptions.”

The integration offers REALTORS® on CommercialSearch one-click access to RPR data found on both the website and RPR Mobile™. Subscribers will find property and owner facts, mortgage and tax info, transaction history, maps and photos. Visual heat maps can be drawn down to the census block group level with 25+ variables including traffic counts and more than 20 million business points of interest. And RPR Commercial reports––which can be sent by way of email or text–– reveal data on consumer segmentation, population, age, marital status, economic conditions, and education comparisons, among other datasets.

David O’Rell, managing director of CommercialSearch, believes the partnership furthers Xceligent’s commitment to providing an open technology platform that combines researched content with leading workflow tools.

“We are excited to partner with Realtors Property Resource®,” said David. “We will now be able to provide RPR account holders an exclusive opportunity to analyze local dynamics surrounding properties actively listed for lease or sale in the CommercialSearch national marketplace.“

About RPR® Commercial

Realtors Property Resource® (RPR®) is a wholly owned subsidiary of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®. RPR Commercial provides REALTORS® with persuasive, decision-making data and reports for all types of clients. From identifying site selection using data sets such as public records, traffic counts, business points of interest, demographic and psychographic insights, and consumer spending data, to presenting reports that accurately depict current market activity as well as future projections, this valuable members-only benefit truly helps to validate a practitioner’s expertise.

About Xceligent™

Xceligent™ is a leading provider of verified commercial real estate information across the United States. Xceligent’s professional research team pro-actively collects: a comprehensive inventory of commercial properties, buildings available for lease and sale, tenant information, sales comparables, historical trends on lease rates and building occupancy, market analytics, and demographics. This information assists real estate professionals, appraisers, owners, investors, and developers that make strategic decisions to lease, sell, and develop commercial properties. Xceligent™, backed by dmg information, has launched an aggressive national expansion that will provide researched information in the 100 largest United States markets. Visit Xceligent.

U.S. Construction Spending Down in January 2017

US Construction Spending Down, Nonresidential Construction Slightly Higher

US Census data indicates a drop in U.S. construction spending for the month of January 2017.  A 1% fall from the figure for the preceding December nonetheless represents an increase of 3% as compared to the preceding January of 2016.

Also hidden in the downtick was a year-over-year rise in nonresidential construction. That figure rose 1.5% year-over-year even as January compared to December showed a 1.9% drop.

Are Massive Gains In New Office Construction Over?

Annual census data showed an eye-popping annual increase in new office projects of 28.8% annually, which was the largest increase for any type of property tracked.  Looking solely at office construction from December-January shows a fall of 1.7%, suggesting either a reversal of a trend or an end-of-year slowdown in the sector generally.

How Can I Get US Census Data On Construction?

The US Census releases data on construction regularly and can be found at Census.gov. U.S. Construction spending numbers are sourced from the Census’s VIP Survey, aka the Value Of Construction Put In Place survey, which provides monthly estimates of the total value of construction work in the US. Included in the survey are estimates of architectural and engineering work, labor, materials, taxes, interests and overhead costs.