Fed: Foreign Lending For Commercial Real Estate Highest since 2010

English: Globe icon.

It’s an old argument, and it goes something like this: the newest federal regulations on commercial real estate lending standards in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis are too onerous for US banks to adapt to. Sarbanes-Oxley and Dodd-Frank regulatory packages taken together, the line of thinking goes, are strangling US banking and threatening efficient capital allocation by introducing piles of red tape. Too many commercial deals slow down and die waiting for capital, and it’s all thanks to these regulations, say many.

An equally old argument is its opposite:  that the culture of banking, from too-big-to-fail banks down to community banks, is terrible at self-regulation. That systemic risk in lending and repackaging is a real thing that came astonishingly close to burning down the world eight years ago. That evidence is plentiful for this side — from Wells Fargo’s recent sham-account fraud and criminality to the total fines levied on big banks breaking the $200B mark.

No matter what side you find yourself on, a fact remains: to get commercial real estate deals financed, an increasing number of players are looking beyond the regulatory footprint of the US. The winners this are foreign lenders, who are enjoying eye-popping growth over the past six years of commercial mortgage lending.

Foreign Lenders Growth in CRE Outstrips CRE Growth Rates US-Chartered Banks 

The Federal Reserve’s Financial Accounts of the United States includes a subsection called “L.220 Commercial Mortgages”.  And on line 13 of the table that illustrates that since 2010, foreign lenders have increased their amount of money lent to commercial mortgages by a little over 80%. Second quarter 2016 has this number at $55.8 billion.

Screenshot of FRB commercial mortgage numbers

Meanwhile, US-chartered institutions increased their business in commercial mortgages by 15% on a portfolio of over $1.4 trillion.  Note the two lines highlighted next to each other in the table above (click to expand).

So while the US banks lead foreign lenders by more than 30-1, the steepest commercial mortgage business growth volume by far is non-US lenders.

The Why And The What

While there’s no Fed data that puts the cause of the sharply increased foreign lending at the feet of recent regulatory attempts, that won’t stop market-ideologues from claiming that regulation is the reason.

But when they do, we have to remember that on a volume basis, under current regulation, the growth increase alone in commercial mortgage lending by US banks absolutely dwarfs the entire total foreign lending commercial mortgage market by almost 4-1.

So recent regulation is by no means fatal to commercial mortgage lending in the US. Even if we assume regulation explains the sharp rise in foreign lending, the period in question has merely eroded the huge lead US lenders have, by moving the ratio of foreign commercial mortgage lending vs US commercial mortgage lending from its 2010 level near 50-1 favoring US lenders vs. a 30-1 ratio today.

When capital markets change, it’s certainly something to keep an eye on. But rushes to judgement about cause and effect just aren’t in the Fed’s own numbers about commercial mortgage lending.

Leave a Reply